6 More Reasons to Drink Coffee

We had to complete our list to start off your week, so here are the final six reasons to drink coffee daily!

Not only does coffee taste great and perk you up, it has an endless array of positive effects on your health. Here are six more reasons why a cup a day can truly help you feel better and actually live a healthier life.

  1. Coffee can make you a better athlete! 
    A 2011 New York Timesreport confirmed what people had thought for years — coffee can help improve your workout. A cup of coffee before a workout can help to jolt performance, particularly in more endurance sports like running and cycling. This is because the caffeine helps to increase the number of fatty acids in the bloodstream, which allows athletes’ muscles to absorb and burn those fats for fuel, saving the body’s small reserves of carbohydrates for later on in the exercise. Also, the results of a recent Spanish study showed that those who enjoyed a cup of coffee prior to their workout burned more calories than those who didn’t. Trained athletes who took in caffeine prior to exercising burned roughly 15% more calories for three hours post-exercise compared with those who ingested a placebo. 
  1. Coffee could reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.
    According to a study conducted by The American Chemical Society, coffee consumption can help lower a person’s risk of Type 2 diabetes. The study’s researchers found that people who drank four or more cups of coffee each day reduced their chance of developing the disease by a whopping 50%. Plus, the risk continued to decrease by 7% with each subsequent cup of coffee.
  1. Coffee can help keep your brain healthy.
    A study conducted by the University of South Florida and the University of Miami found that people older than 65 who had higher blood levels of caffeine developed Alzheimer’s disease two to four years later than those with lower caffeine levels. According to Dr. Chuanhai Cao, a neuroscientist at the USF, and co-author of the study, “We firmly believe that moderate coffee consumption can appreciably reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s or delay its onset.”
  1. Coffee may make you smarter. Yes, smarter!
    In a 2006 Time magazine report, journalist Michael Lemonick, himself an avid coffee-drinker, found evidence to suggest that  caffeine allows your brain to work in a more efficient and smarter way. “It allows you to use what brain power you have in a much more efficient and focused way,” he said. “When you’re sleep-deprived and you take caffeine, pretty much anything you measure will improve: reaction time, vigilance, attention, logical reasoning — most of the complex functions you associate with intelligence.” We’ll drink to that!
  1. Coffee consumption has been linked to lower levels of suicide.
    We have already discussed how the high levels of antioxidants in coffee can help make people feel happier — but to take that one step further, a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health found that drinking between two and four cups of coffee can reduce the risk of suicide in men and women by as much as 50 percent! The reason is thought to be because coffee acts as a mild antidepressant by aiding in the production of neurotransmitters like serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline.
  1. Coffee could help with Parkinson’s disease.
    Many studies have reported that people who consume more caffeine are less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. But according to aScienceDaily report in 2012, drinking coffee may help people with Parkinson’s disease to control their movement. “Studies have shown that people who use caffeine are less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease, but this is one of the first studies in humans to show that caffeine can help with movement symptoms for people who already have the disease,” said Ronald Postuma, MD, the study author.

 

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source/s:

www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/17/coffee-health-benefits_n_4102133.html 

www.rachelorsie.blog.organogold.com

 

5 Reasons to Cafe Rae’s Way

 Why drinking coffee every day is good for your health.

Here at Rae’s Cafe, we can come up with countless reasons to drink coffee —namely because we have endless coffee products that are a great addition to any active lifestyle. But there are reasons beyond mere enjoyment and flavor, as many different studies are constantly showing. Here are five great reasons that adding a cup of coffee to your day is not only a pleasure, it’s good for you!

  1. Coffee is a great source of antioxidants!
    According to a 2005 study, Americans get more of their antioxidants from coffee than from any other dietary source — nothing else even comes close. The study also found that while many fruits and vegetables are high in antioxidants, the human body seems to most readily absorb those found in coffee. Antioxidants are substances that help prevent the damaging effects of oxidation on cells throughout the body — so they are always a good thing!
  1. One sniff = less stress
    In addition to helping people to wake up each morning, simply the smell of coffee has been found to make people feel less stressed! Researchers at the Seoul National University examined the brains of rats who were stressed with sleep deprivation, and found that the rats that were exposed to coffee aroma experienced changes in the brain proteins tied to that stress. So next time you’ve had a sleepless night, a cup of coffee is definitely the answer!
  1. Coffee can help protect the liver
    A 2006 study (which  included 125,000 people over 22 years) found that people who drink at least one cup of coffee a day are 20% less likely to develop cirrhosis of the liver (an autoimmune disease caused by excessive alcohol consumption that could lead to liver failure and cancer). Similar studies have also shown that coffee can help prevent people from developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). So whether you are a whiskey connoisseur or a teetotaler, coffee can help protect your liver.
  1. Coffee can help make you happier!
    A National Institute of Health study revealed that people who drink four or more cups of coffee per day were about 10% less likely to be depressed than those who had never touched the stuff. The study author, Honglei Chen, MD, PhD, stated that the reason coffee makes you feel good is thought to be because of those trusty antioxidants.
  1. Coffee could help protect you from skin cancer. 
    A study at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School (which followed 112,897 men and women over a 20-year period) found that women who drink three or more cups of coffee a day are much less likely to develop skin cancer than those who don’t.

 

 

 

 

source/s:

http://www.rachelorsie.organogold.com/blog

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/17/coffee-health-benefits_n_4102133.html

 

A Long & Distinguished History

Ganoderma lucidum is a key ingredient in the Organo’s line of products that compliments the healthy lifestyle that is at the core of Rae’s way of life. At Organo, they use only the finest Ganoderma lucidum, creating a flavorless, invisible powder that adds amazing properties to everything from coffee and tea to personal care products.

Here are some facts about the incredible history of this truly incredible mushroom:

  • Ganoderma lucidum goes by many names. It is also known as the “Lingzhi” mushroom and the “Reishi” mushroom. The Chinese name, Lingzhi, means “spiritual potency”, while the Japanese name, Reishi, translates as “King of herbs.”The Vietnamese name for the Ganoderma mushroom, “linh chi,”literally means “supernatural mushroom.”
  • The botanical name, Ganoderma, derives from the Greek words ganos, which means, “shining”, and derma, which means, “skin”. This refers to the shiny exterior of the mushroom’s cap. The word Lucidum is also Latin for “shining.”
  • Ganoderma lucidum has a long and prestigious history — and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for over 2,000 years, making it one of the oldest mushrooms known to have been used medicinally.
  • Shi-Jean Lee —the most renowned doctor of the Ming Dynasty —strongly endorsed the effectiveness of Ganoderma in his renowned book Great Pharmacopoeia(Ban Chao Gang Moo). In it, he wrote, “long-term taking of Ganoderma will build a strong, healthy body and assure a long life.”
  • The proliferation of Ganoderma lucidum images in art began in 1400 AD, and they are often associated with Taoism. However, the mentions of the mushroom soon extended beyond religion.
  • The Ganoderma or “Lingzhi” mushroom was often mentioned in ancient Chinese texts such as medicinal and herbology books, and was featured in much artwork, including wood block prints in early mycology (the study of fungi) history books.
  • The first book wholly devoted to the description of herbs and their medicinal value was Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing, written in the Eastern Han dynasty of China (25-220 AD). This book is also known as Classic of the Materia Medicaor Shen-nong’s Herbal Classics. It describes botanical, zoological, and mineral substances, and was composed in the second century under the pseudonym of Shen-nong (“the holy farmer”). The book, which has been continually updated and extended, describes the beneficial effects of several mushrooms with a reference to the medicinal mushroom Gandoerma lucidum. [1]
  • Ganoderma lucidum is a potent source of antioxidants. The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicinesays it contains one of the highest concentrations of antioxidants in any food.

 

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Source: www.rachelorsie.organogold.com/blog/ogtreasures

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92757/

 

Small Business Saturday

Today is Small Business Saturday and in honor, Rae’s Cafe is giving YOU up to 40% off our line of gourmet coffees and teas! We’re also doing FREE shipping on orders over $50, just use coupon code: SHIP50. If you have any questions, please contact me through email or my business number on website. Have a wonderful holiday weekend!!!

CLICK HERE TO SAVE!

 

An Introduction to Cuban Coffee

The influence of the Cuban population is everywhere in Miami —in the culture, the food, the music, the nightlife and more. But one of the simplest ways to experience a taste of Cuba is to try a Cuban coffee. Known as Café Cubano or sometimes Cafecito, this drink is a distinctive molasses-sweet strong espresso—and it is the high-octane that fuels South Florida.

Here’s a primer on what to order when you want to sample a truly unique Miami experience that is a Cuban-style coffee:

Cafecito: This refers to an espresso shot which is sweetened (usually with natural brown sugar) as it is being brewed.

Colada: This refers to a larger cup of cafecito that comes with little thimble-sized cups for sharing with friends.

Cortadito: This is a shot of cafecito topped with steamed milk, and translates literally in Spanish as “small cut.”It is usually 75/25 espresso and milk.

Café con Leche: This is a shot of the Cuban espresso served with hot or steamed milk. Usually the milk is served separately, so the espresso can be poured into the milk at the desired strength. This is the traditional Cuban breakfast beverage, and is often served with pastries or toasted Cuban bread (perfect for dunking!).

With the vibrant energy of Miami, a quick shot of Cafe Cubano is a great way to stay energized, and also a wonderful way to strike up a conversation with locals — Cuban coffee is often served at walk-up windows known as “ventanitas”and enjoyed at the counter alongside fellow patrons!

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Japanese Tea History Part 2

Tuesday, we looked at how tea arrived in Japan, by way of Buddhist scholars who brought it back from China in the early 800s. Since then, tea has grown to become an important part of Japanese culture. Here’s a look at how tea became such an integral and popular item in Japan.

Tea History in Japan: Part 2

  • In 1740, Soen Nagatani developed Japanese sencha, an unfermented form of green tea. To prepare sencha, the tea leaves are first steam-pressed, then rolled and dried into a loose tea. The dried leaves are brewed with hot water to yield the final drink. Sencha is now one of Japan’s mainstay teas.
  • The other more traditional type of green tea in Japan is matcha, the finely powdered green tea that is the focus of the Japanese tea ceremony. Matcha is prepared using shade-grown tea leaves that are rolled, laid flat to dry and then stone ground to form a bright green, fine powder.
  • At the end of the Meiji Era (1868–1912), machine manufacturing of green tea was introduced in Japan, and began replacing handmade tea. Machines took over the processes of primary drying, tea rolling, secondary drying, final rolling, and steaming of the tea leaves.
  • The first time tea was exported from Japan was in 1610, by the Dutch East India Company from Hirado, Nagasaki.
  • In 1859, when the ports of Nagasaki, Yokohama and Hakodate were opened to foreign trade, tea became one of Japan’s main export commodities, with an estimated 181 tons of tea exported in that year alone.
  • The three largest producing regions for Japanese tea are Shizuoka, Kagoshima and Mie. Shizuoka, which is located in the area between Mt. Fuji and the Pacific coast west of Tokyo, accounts for around 40% of Japan’s annual commercial tea production.
  • While Japanese culture is now renowned for the elaborate tea ceremony that developed over thousands of years, in today’s fast-paced modern culture, convenience is key. So ready-to-drink green tea products, particularly bottled or iced in vending machines, now account for an estimated 20% of all green tea consumption in Japan.
  • Green tea is so ubiquitous in Japan that whenever tea or “ocha” is offered, 99.9% of the time, it is green tea, which of course comes from the same plant as black tea, but does not experience fermentation or oxidization, and instead is steamed soon after being picked to stop the oxidization process.

Of course, we at Rae’s Café have always admired green tea, which is why Organo’s Organic Green Tea is one of our most popular products.

Part 2-Japanese Tea History

Japanese Tea History Part 1

Obviously, Japan has a long and storied history when it comes to tea. So, we thought we’d take a look at how tea arrived in Japan, and how it became an integral part of Japanese culture over the years.

Tea History in Japan: Part 1

  • Tea is thought to have been first brought back to Japan from China by Buddhist scholars, who were sent as envoys to learn more about Chinese culture.
  • Ancient texts indicate that the first batch of tea seeds were brought back to Japan by a Buddhist priest named Saicho in 805, and then by another named Kukai in 806.
  • After that, during the latter part of the Heian period (794-1185), Emperor Saga was said to have encouraged the cultivation of tea plants in Japan.
  • At this time, tea was extremely valuable, so it became a drink of the royal classes, and was enjoyed primarily by imperial court nobles and Buddhist monks.
  • In 1191, in the early Kamakura Period (1185-1333), Eisai, founder of the Rinzai sect of Zen Buddhism, brought back a new type of tea seeds to Kyoto from Sung-dynasty China.
  • It was Eisai who wrote the first specialty book about tea in Japan, called Kissa Yōjōki or How to Stay Healthy by Drinking Tea. The two-volume book was written in 1211 after Eisai’s second and last visit to China. The first sentence states, “Tea is the ultimate mental and medical remedy and has the ability to make one’s life more full and complete.”
  • Eisai was also said to have been instrumental in introducing tea consumption to the warrior or Samurai class.
  • Slowly, green tea became a staple among cultured people in Japan — a brew for the gentry and the Buddhist priesthood, alike. Production increased and tea became increasingly accessible, though was still a privilege enjoyed mostly by the upper classes.
  • The pastimes made popular in China in the 12th and 13th centuries – reading poetry, writing calligraphy, painting, and discussing philosophy while enjoying tea – eventually became popular in Japan, particularly within the Samurai society, and helped spur the development of the tea ceremony.
  • From the late 15th to the late 16th century, tea masters such as Murata Shuko, Takeno Joo and Sen no Rikyu developed a new tea ceremony, referred to as Wabicha. This style of tea ceremony gained a strong following among Samurai, and is the origin of the tea ceremony still practiced today.

As you can imagine, there’s so much more to the history of tea in Japan. So stay tuned for Saturday’s post, where we’ll look at the next stages in the evolution of tea culture in Japan.

Part 1-Japanese Tea History

The Perfect Espresso Shot

Met an amazing lady, Bethany from Ghergich & Co. and learned how to get the perfect espresso shot from this amazing infographic her team put together to help you save time and money while living luxuriously! I just wanted to share this with you before I post for the day 🙂


Source: PartSelect.com

My Black Coffee Confessions

Today, let’s devote this article to one of the simplest pleasures in the world — a cup of strong black coffee. With Rae’s Café and Organo Gold, there’s more than one option for lovers of strong black coffee — a flavor that true coffee-lovers appreciate.

Gourmet Black Coffee

Fans of this great product can experience the aroma of freshly brewed coffee as soon as they tear open their sachet of OG Gourmet Black Coffee. Then comes the flavor, which is robust and smooth, for black coffee perfection.

Premium Gourmet King of Coffee 

Connoisseurs adore the aroma and flavor of this luxurious product. Organo Gold select only the finest organic beans to produce this bold, flavorful coffee. We like to think of it as a “necessary daily luxury” we can enjoy any time.

Premium Gourmet Royal Brewed

This delectable coffee comes straight from the famed blue mountains of Jamaica — a region renowned for its premium coffee. In Jamaica, the beans are hand-sorted to ensure only the finest coffee makes it into this fresh, fruity, flavorful blend, for a rich flavor that is second to none. This is a brew-it-yourself blend truly fit for royalty.

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Jamaica Makin’ Great Coffee

The ‘coffee cult’ hipster types often obsess about what growing region their precious coffee beans come from. And they aren’t wrong. Coffee beans from different regions, similar to grapes used for wine, can have different flavor profiles and tastes, with “notes” of everything from cherries and chocolate to tropical fruits such as pineapple or mango.

Over the past few decades, coffee grown in Jamaica’s Blue Mountain region has developed a reputation that has made it one of the most sought-after coffees in the world. Coffee beans grown in this area are prized for their mild flavor and lack of bitterness. Over 80 percent of all Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee is exported to Japan, and is even used as the flavor based for Tia Maria and other coffee liqueurs.

The Premium Gourmet Royal Brewed Coffee featured at Rae’s Café is made using beans from this prized region. The beans are hand-sorted in the picturesque Blue Mountain region to ensure only the finest coffee makes it into this fresh, flavorful blend. The result is a coffee beverage with a rich, luxurious aroma and flavor second to none.

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