The Two C’s of New World History

On March 15, 1493, Christopher Columbus returned to Spain after his first voyage to the New World. The 2 C’s could be considered to be Christopher Columbus, the explorer renowned for “discovering” North America and many other places in the New World. But, according to many, there are two other significant C’s in America — Coffee and Chocolate!

And the two are linked by more than just alliteration. When Christopher Columbus first sailed that ocean blue (as the rhyme goes) in 1492, he traveled to the so-called New World at the behest of the Queen of Spain. And two of the precious items he brought back to Europe? You guessed it: coffee and cacao beans.

Here’s a lowdown on some of the history that links Christopher Columbus with two of the Americas’ favorite treats — coffee and chocolate:

  • The introduction of coffee beans to the Americas is often attributed to Columbus, as it is thought that he carried coffee beans on one of his voyages to the New World.
  • Columbus is also often credited with bringing chocolate, by way of cacao beans, back to Europe and then on to the rest of the world.
  • Columbus is believed to have “discovered” cocoa beans in around 1502, when he and his crew appropriated the cargo of a native Mayan trading ship, near what is now known as Honduras.
  • Apparently Columbus assumed that the beans were some kind of almond. But, sensing the value placed upon these mysterious legumes, he took them.

So, what lesson can we take from this? Well, one thing’s for sure. We’d like to thank Columbus for that initial transportation of the magical beans behind coffee and chocolate. We guess we have him to thank, in a round-about way, for one of our favorite products — the Cafe Mocha. And we can bet he would have been a big fan of one of the best — the BrewKup™  in Chocolate Almond.  

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My Black Coffee Confessions

Today, let’s devote this article to one of the simplest pleasures in the world — a cup of strong black coffee. With Rae’s Café and Organo Gold, there’s more than one option for lovers of strong black coffee — a flavor that true coffee-lovers appreciate.

Gourmet Black Coffee

Fans of this great product can experience the aroma of freshly brewed coffee as soon as they tear open their sachet of OG Gourmet Black Coffee. Then comes the flavor, which is robust and smooth, for black coffee perfection.

Premium Gourmet King of Coffee 

Connoisseurs adore the aroma and flavor of this luxurious product. Organo Gold select only the finest organic beans to produce this bold, flavorful coffee. We like to think of it as a “necessary daily luxury” we can enjoy any time.

Premium Gourmet Royal Brewed

This delectable coffee comes straight from the famed blue mountains of Jamaica — a region renowned for its premium coffee. In Jamaica, the beans are hand-sorted to ensure only the finest coffee makes it into this fresh, fruity, flavorful blend, for a rich flavor that is second to none. This is a brew-it-yourself blend truly fit for royalty.

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More Fun Facts About Coffee in the Americas

For all you fact fanatics-here’s more information about coffee and the America’s. Although coffee beans and brewing originated in the Middle East it quickly spread to the far reaches of the world. Coffee is not just a popular drink, but a popular crop in the Americas, where much of the area had a climate that was ideal for the beans to thrive.

Here are 15 Fun Facts about the history of coffee in the Americas, from South and Central America and the Caribbean right up through to North America and Hawaii.

  • Hawaii is the only US state that produces coffee commercially.
  • The United States imports more than $4 billion dollars’ worth of coffee each year.
  • New Yorkers drink almost 7 times more coffee than other cities in the US.
  • Coffee first made its way to the Caribbean around 1720, when naval commander Gabriel de Clieu brought coffee seedlings to the island of Martinique.
  • Those sprouts flourished and 50 years later there were over 18,500 coffee trees in Martinique — enabling the spread of coffee cultivation to Haiti, Mexico and other nearby islands in the Caribbean.
  • In around 1727, the King of Portugal sent an emissary to French Guinea to obtain coffee seeds to become a part of the coffee market. The King’s emissary is said to have initially had difficulty obtaining these seeds, but after charming the French Governor’s wife, she sent him enough seeds and shoots to start up a coffee industry in Brazil.
  • In 1893, the coffee from Brazil was introduced back into Kenya and Tanzania, not far from its place of origin in Ethiopia 600 years prior — ending the energetic bean’s transcontinental journey.
  • In the 1930s Brazil took off as major producer of coffee, and now produces around a third of the world’s coffee beans.
  • Coffee represents 75% of all the caffeine consumed in the United States.
  • The first webcam was invented at The University of Cambridge to let people know whether or not the coffee pot was full.
  • Americans consume 400 million cups of coffee per day, equivalent to 146 billion cups of coffee per year, making the United States one of the leading consumers of coffee in the world.
  • The average American worker spends approximately $20 on coffee per week — be it lattes, roasted beans or pods for their at home espresso machine.
  • Seattle has 10 times more coffee stores per 100,000 residents than the United States has overall.
  • When coffee was first introduced in America, it was not as popularly received as it had been in Europe. Some scholars believe coffee’s popularity grew during the Revolutionary War, as tea became more and more difficult to obtain from British merchants.
  • If ever offered a “Cowboy Coffee” — politely decline! According to legend, cowboys used to make coffee by putting ground coffee in a clean sock and dunking it in cold water. They’d then heat it over the campfire, and pour the liquid into tin cups when it was ready to drink.

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Sugar & Spice = Tijuana Style Coffee

Coffee in Tijuana has a definite local flavor. The popular local drink is a concoction known as “café de la olla”, which is coffee with added milk, spices and sugar.

In Tijuana, coffee was traditionally primarily a morning drink. But as a 2013 OC Weekly article [July, 2013] by Dave Lieberman noted, the coffee culture sweeping across other parts of North America is trickling across the border into the Tijuana landscape. One local gem Lieberman found while exploring Tijuana was a cafe called Caffe Sospeso. “Caffe Sospeso — which takes its name from the Neapolitan pay-it-forward tradition of “suspended coffee”, where you pay for two coffees but only drink one, so that someone down on his or her luck can have a free coffee later — has been in Tijuana for 18 years, but has concentrated lately on changing the coffee culture on the south side of la línea,” Leiberman wrote.

Here, in place of the sweet, spicy, milky drink favored by locals, he found a more contemporary coffee experience, with cold-brewed pourover and French press coffee preparations showcasing the beautiful aromas of their carefully sourced beans.

So, for those who prefer their coffee dark and flavorful but not sweet and milky, the growth and popularity of modern venues such as Caffe Sospeso seems to be a good sign.

Tip: For those who do enjoy sweet, milky coffee with a hint of spice, why not try adding some cinnamon and perhaps a dash of agave syrup to your sachets of Gourmet Latte or Cafe Mocha — to create your own Tijuana style coffee experience at home.

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The Natural Difference

The Ganoderma lucidium mushroom, so prized by Chinese herbalists, is unique in that grows in wooden trees or logs. Some Ganoderma is harvested using plastic bags which mean that the mushroom’s precious spores cannot effectively propagate, making plastic bag-harvested Ganoderma much less potent.

At Rae’s Cafe, we’re proud of Organo Gold’s natural, organic growing methods and all-natural processing practices. They partnered with some of the most reputable people in the world to produce our Ganoderma lucidum powder.

Here’s a breakdown of how we take these fantastic-looking mushrooms and turn them into an almost magical, potent and wonderfully beneficial powder:

  • First, OG’s Ganoderma mushrooms are grown undisturbed on maple logs high in the Wuyi Mountains of China’s Fuxhou region. It’s cold and deeply forested up there, and these miraculous mushrooms thrive.
  • Once harvested, their partners at the $240 million Gano Herb Industrial Park process the mushrooms. The agriculture and food scientists at OG’s state-of-the-art facility use cutting-edge technologies, techniques and equipment to gently dry, sterilize and process the mushrooms, transforming the tough, wood-like caps into a fine powder.
  • OG’s expert team then carefully transforms the mushroom stems and caps into a fine powder, which is then easily added to our coffee, tea, and other beverage products, as well as personal care products.
  • OG packages and ships all beverage, personal care and nutraceutical products to our partners and distributors in more than 30 countries across the globe.

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When in Rome…

You couldn’t find a more quintessentially coffee-loving place than the vibrant Italian city of Rome. Coffee is an integral part of the fabric of daily life in this energetic city. Locals whizzing by on scooters, flocks of tourists walking the Roman ruins and the Colosseum, and people everywhere sipping espressos.

Here in the US coffee has become something of an “on-the-go” staple. In Rome, it’s more of a “drink and go” scenario — with many coffee bars offering standing room only for folks who want to quickly sip their espresso without even sitting down. You won’t spy any 20 ounce Frappuccinos® here (and if you do, they will likely belong to tourists!).

According to CNN Travel correspondent and proud Roman, Silvia Marchetti, it’s part of the culture. “Romans like their coffee fast, strong and burning hot. We gulp it down, on the run, sans sitting,” writes Marchetti. “Drink and go: that’s the philosophy. It’s part of the lifestyle, a persistent aroma that envelopes people from morning till after dinner.”

Here are a few fun facts about Romans and Italians in general and their coffee, and a few tips on how and what to order, and when:

  • Cappuccino is considered a breakfast coffee, so traditional Italians do not order this drink any time after around 11:00am.
  • Caffè ristretto(kah-FE ri-STRE-to) is a so-called “restricted coffee” — which references the way in which the stream of coffee is stopped before the normal amount, making the coffee stronger, or more concentrated, than a regular coffee or espresso.
  • Many Romans drink five or more espressos per day.

For Rae’s coffee lovers … For a strong, robust coffee, add 4-6 ounces of hot water to your favorite Gourmet Coffee, Latte or Mocha..

For more information about Organo Gold’s European convention, go to: https://euconvention.organogold.com/.

Source:  http://goitaly.about.com/od/foodandwineofitaly/a/italian_coffee.htm

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Brits Swap Cuppa for Cappuccino

There are few things considered more quintessentially British than a nice cup of tea. But that seems to be changing, as sales of tea bags have plummeted, according to a 2014 report in The Telegraph. The December 17 report cited new figures indicating that the volume of tea sales had fallen by more than 6 percent in the past 12 months, almost double the decline of the previous year. Industry magazine The Grocer said sales of Tetley Round tea bags were down 17.3 percent in the past year, while PG Tips Pyramid sales were 6.4 per cent lower.
The falling rates of tea bag sales have been attributed primarily to the rising popularity of coffee chains and espresso bars, as well as the increased popularity of at-home coffee preparations and machines. Experts also noted that many people are switching from traditional black tea to other teas, such as green tea or herbal infusions. Coffee products, however, are flying off the shelves faster than ever, as the report noted that sales of supermarket products such as Nescafe have increased by more than 6.3 percent.
Coffee is apparently becoming the preferred drink while dining out, as well as at home, according to Nigel Travis, chief executive of Dunkin Brands, owner of Dunkin Donuts. “If you look over the past year, coffee sales in restaurants are about two-and-half-times higher than tea,” he said.
Britain as a nation of coffee drinkers? It seems to be heading that way. And we’ll certainly drink to that.

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8 Fun Facts About Coffee

We can’t stop talking about coffee here at Rae’s Cafe, and we know most of you share our passion for this incredible beverage. So here are a few more fun facts for you all to share with friends and acquaintances, over – as always – your favorite cup of Organo Gold.
-It takes around 40 coffee beans to make one shot of espresso. Europeans love their coffee.

-The top five coffee drinking countries in the world in 2012 were: 1. Finland 2. Norway 3. Iceland 4. Denmark 5. The Netherlands.

-One third of all the world’s coffee is grown in Brazil.

-The world record for coffee consumption is 82 cups in 7 hours — but we don’t recommend it!

-In the US, the average American worker spends $20 a week on coffee.

-America consumes around 400 million cups of coffee per day — that’s enough to fill 14.2 Statues of Liberty!
Seattle has the most coffee shops per capita in the US, with 1,640, and ranks number one on the list of most caffeinated cities.

-America spends an estimated $4 billion importing coffee each year — Hawaii is the only state that grows coffee commercially.

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Survey Says…Alot of People LOVE Coffee!

A lot of people profess their undying love for coffee each morning. “I love my latte”, or “I can’t live without my morning cuppa Joe” and so on are heard across the world each morning as people get out of bed. But a recent survey by hotel chain Le Méridien Hotels & Resorts showed that people love coffee even more than previously thought!

Some key results from the study included:

  • 78% of respondents said they would rather give up alcohol, social media or relations with their spouse for a year, rather than forfeit coffee.
  • 53% of respondents chose coffee over physical intimacy as their preferred morning wake-up call.
  • 54% of respondents make their morning brew right at home.
  • 73% of respondents would give up television and internet in a hotel for the perfect cup of coffee.
  • 63% of respondents would give up alcohol over coffee while staying at a hotel.
  • 58% of people surveyed said they drink coffee to relax, while 55% also drink it primarily for the taste.

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For more on the study, see the full article on BusinessWire.com.

Source: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20130926005859/en/Le-Meridien-Study-Reveals-People-Choose-Coffee

Tea Time Fun Facts

Tea is a beverage often associated with health (all those antioxidants), breakfast (all those crumpets!) and ancient cultures (all those ceremonies). So tea has a long, diverse and storied history. Here are some fun facts about tea you may not have known:

  • Tea bags were invented in America in the early 1800s, and were initially used to hold samples of teas brought from India. Today, an estimated 96% of all cups of tea served around the world are made using tea bags.
  • After tourism, the cultivation of tea is India’s second largest industry.
  • Tea leaves are a natural deterrent against insects such as mosquitoes. Simply use slightly damp leaves to add the scent of tea to the areas you want to keep insect-free.
  • Tea leaves can also help to heal shaving cuts, eliminate bad odors, and make a great fertilizer for roses.

As we all know, tea is a natural antioxidant, but it is also rich in essential vitamins and minerals such as vitamins B2, B1 and B6, potassium, manganese, folic acid and calcium.

And of course Rae’s tea products are also enhanced with Organo Gold’s prized Ganoderma powder, making Rae’s teas some of the most beneficial beverages around!

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