5 Reasons to Cafe Rae’s Way

 Why drinking coffee every day is good for your health.

Here at Rae’s Cafe, we can come up with countless reasons to drink coffee —namely because we have endless coffee products that are a great addition to any active lifestyle. But there are reasons beyond mere enjoyment and flavor, as many different studies are constantly showing. Here are five great reasons that adding a cup of coffee to your day is not only a pleasure, it’s good for you!

  1. Coffee is a great source of antioxidants!
    According to a 2005 study, Americans get more of their antioxidants from coffee than from any other dietary source — nothing else even comes close. The study also found that while many fruits and vegetables are high in antioxidants, the human body seems to most readily absorb those found in coffee. Antioxidants are substances that help prevent the damaging effects of oxidation on cells throughout the body — so they are always a good thing!
  1. One sniff = less stress
    In addition to helping people to wake up each morning, simply the smell of coffee has been found to make people feel less stressed! Researchers at the Seoul National University examined the brains of rats who were stressed with sleep deprivation, and found that the rats that were exposed to coffee aroma experienced changes in the brain proteins tied to that stress. So next time you’ve had a sleepless night, a cup of coffee is definitely the answer!
  1. Coffee can help protect the liver
    A 2006 study (which  included 125,000 people over 22 years) found that people who drink at least one cup of coffee a day are 20% less likely to develop cirrhosis of the liver (an autoimmune disease caused by excessive alcohol consumption that could lead to liver failure and cancer). Similar studies have also shown that coffee can help prevent people from developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). So whether you are a whiskey connoisseur or a teetotaler, coffee can help protect your liver.
  1. Coffee can help make you happier!
    A National Institute of Health study revealed that people who drink four or more cups of coffee per day were about 10% less likely to be depressed than those who had never touched the stuff. The study author, Honglei Chen, MD, PhD, stated that the reason coffee makes you feel good is thought to be because of those trusty antioxidants.
  1. Coffee could help protect you from skin cancer. 
    A study at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School (which followed 112,897 men and women over a 20-year period) found that women who drink three or more cups of coffee a day are much less likely to develop skin cancer than those who don’t.

 

 

 

 

source/s:

http://www.rachelorsie.organogold.com/blog

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/17/coffee-health-benefits_n_4102133.html

 

A Long & Distinguished History

Ganoderma lucidum is a key ingredient in the Organo’s line of products that compliments the healthy lifestyle that is at the core of Rae’s way of life. At Organo, they use only the finest Ganoderma lucidum, creating a flavorless, invisible powder that adds amazing properties to everything from coffee and tea to personal care products.

Here are some facts about the incredible history of this truly incredible mushroom:

  • Ganoderma lucidum goes by many names. It is also known as the “Lingzhi” mushroom and the “Reishi” mushroom. The Chinese name, Lingzhi, means “spiritual potency”, while the Japanese name, Reishi, translates as “King of herbs.”The Vietnamese name for the Ganoderma mushroom, “linh chi,”literally means “supernatural mushroom.”
  • The botanical name, Ganoderma, derives from the Greek words ganos, which means, “shining”, and derma, which means, “skin”. This refers to the shiny exterior of the mushroom’s cap. The word Lucidum is also Latin for “shining.”
  • Ganoderma lucidum has a long and prestigious history — and has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for over 2,000 years, making it one of the oldest mushrooms known to have been used medicinally.
  • Shi-Jean Lee —the most renowned doctor of the Ming Dynasty —strongly endorsed the effectiveness of Ganoderma in his renowned book Great Pharmacopoeia(Ban Chao Gang Moo). In it, he wrote, “long-term taking of Ganoderma will build a strong, healthy body and assure a long life.”
  • The proliferation of Ganoderma lucidum images in art began in 1400 AD, and they are often associated with Taoism. However, the mentions of the mushroom soon extended beyond religion.
  • The Ganoderma or “Lingzhi” mushroom was often mentioned in ancient Chinese texts such as medicinal and herbology books, and was featured in much artwork, including wood block prints in early mycology (the study of fungi) history books.
  • The first book wholly devoted to the description of herbs and their medicinal value was Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing, written in the Eastern Han dynasty of China (25-220 AD). This book is also known as Classic of the Materia Medicaor Shen-nong’s Herbal Classics. It describes botanical, zoological, and mineral substances, and was composed in the second century under the pseudonym of Shen-nong (“the holy farmer”). The book, which has been continually updated and extended, describes the beneficial effects of several mushrooms with a reference to the medicinal mushroom Gandoerma lucidum. [1]
  • Ganoderma lucidum is a potent source of antioxidants. The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicinesays it contains one of the highest concentrations of antioxidants in any food.

 

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Source: www.rachelorsie.organogold.com/blog/ogtreasures

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92757/

 

Small Business Saturday

Today is Small Business Saturday and in honor, Rae’s Cafe is giving YOU up to 40% off our line of gourmet coffees and teas! We’re also doing FREE shipping on orders over $50, just use coupon code: SHIP50. If you have any questions, please contact me through email or my business number on website. Have a wonderful holiday weekend!!!

CLICK HERE TO SAVE!

 

An Introduction to Cuban Coffee

The influence of the Cuban population is everywhere in Miami —in the culture, the food, the music, the nightlife and more. But one of the simplest ways to experience a taste of Cuba is to try a Cuban coffee. Known as Café Cubano or sometimes Cafecito, this drink is a distinctive molasses-sweet strong espresso—and it is the high-octane that fuels South Florida.

Here’s a primer on what to order when you want to sample a truly unique Miami experience that is a Cuban-style coffee:

Cafecito: This refers to an espresso shot which is sweetened (usually with natural brown sugar) as it is being brewed.

Colada: This refers to a larger cup of cafecito that comes with little thimble-sized cups for sharing with friends.

Cortadito: This is a shot of cafecito topped with steamed milk, and translates literally in Spanish as “small cut.”It is usually 75/25 espresso and milk.

Café con Leche: This is a shot of the Cuban espresso served with hot or steamed milk. Usually the milk is served separately, so the espresso can be poured into the milk at the desired strength. This is the traditional Cuban breakfast beverage, and is often served with pastries or toasted Cuban bread (perfect for dunking!).

With the vibrant energy of Miami, a quick shot of Cafe Cubano is a great way to stay energized, and also a wonderful way to strike up a conversation with locals — Cuban coffee is often served at walk-up windows known as “ventanitas”and enjoyed at the counter alongside fellow patrons!

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History of Latte Art

Who doesn’t enjoy their latte that a little bit more when the barista goes to the trouble of adding a little heart-shaped or leaf-shaped swirl on the top of the foam? This is what’s known as latte art, and it has become an increasingly popular art form in cafes across the world in recent years. In fact, it’s pretty much standard practice for a latte or a cappuccino.

Here are a few fun facts about this art form, how it developed and how it’s done:

  • Latte art is a method of pouring steamed milk into a shot of espresso in a certain way, resulting in a pattern or design on the surface of the drink. It can also be created or embellished by simply “drawing” in the top layer of foam using a toothpick or similar implement.
  • These aforementioned methods are the two main types of latte art: free pouring (creating the pattern during the pour) and etching (using a tool to create a pattern after the pour).
  • Free pouring is far more common, and has resulted in the two most commonly seen latte art patterns —the heart shape and the rosetta, a fern-like design.
  • Latte art is made possible by the combination of the crema (which is an emulsion of coffee oil and brewed coffee) and the microfoam, which is a foam of air in milk.
  • David Schomer, the owner of Seattle’s Espresso Vivace coffee shop, is credited with bringing latte art to the forefront of coffee culture in the US.
  • Schomer credits the development of microfoam (“velvet foam” or “milk texturing”) to Jack Kelly of Seattle coffee shop Uptown Espresso in 1986.
  • Schomer worked on his technique of free-pouring the textured milk using the sides of the cup to form swirls and waves, and perfected the heart pattern by 1989. Then he saw the now popular rosetta pattern in a photo from a café in Italy in 1992, and worked for about six months perfecting the technique to create that design.
  • Today, free pouring latte art designs (such as the heart and the rosetta) have become pretty much standard practice when making drinks, and many baristas take part in international latte art competitions.

Coffee Art in OG showed its style in last year’s Organo Gold’s OGlicious Recipe Contest. In addition to fantastic coffee recipes, all the entries were compiled into a Holiday Cookbook in which proceeds go to OG’s charity – OG Cares.

Ooh-LaLa

A Nation of Coffee Lovers

They sure do love their coffee in Italy —it’s almost impossible to picture Italy without those small white espresso cups somewhere in the scene. To celebrate Italian coffee culture, we thought we’d take a look about the history and culture of the humble bean in this coffee-adoring country.

  • Espresso is regulated by the Italian government because it is considered an such essential part of Italian daily life.
  • Coffee is often drunk quickly, standing up at espresso bars in cities across Italy.
  • If your order “un caffè” in Italy, you’ll receive a shot of espresso.
  • Coffee was first introduced to Europe from Egypt through the Italian city of Venice, where a flourishing trade between the local businessmen and Arabs enabled a large variety of commodities and goods to be imported, including the precious new commodity that was coffee beans.
  • The first “caffe” reportedly opened in Venice in 1683, and soon became synonymous with comfortable atmosphere, conversation, and good food, adding romance and sophistication to the coffee-drinking experience.
  • It was two Italians who came up with that we know today as the espresso machine. First, in Turin, Italy in 1884, a man by the name of Angelo Moriondo lodged a patent for a “steam-driven instantaneous coffee beverage making device.” This patent is considered by many to be a precursor of the espresso coffee machine.
  • Then, in 1901, Milanese manufacturer Luigi Bezzera came up with some improvements to the espresso machine. He patented a number of these, the first of which was applied for on the 19th of December 1901. It was titled “Innovations in the machinery to prepare and immediately serve coffee beverage.” Bezzera was said to have come up with the idea in order to reduce the amount of time his factory workers spent on their coffee breaks!
  • An estimated 14 billion espresso coffees are consumed each year in Italy, and Italians consume approximately 8 pounds of coffee per capita, per year.

NationofCoffeeLovers

The Perfect Espresso Shot

Met an amazing lady, Bethany from Ghergich & Co. and learned how to get the perfect espresso shot from this amazing infographic her team put together to help you save time and money while living luxuriously! I just wanted to share this with you before I post for the day 🙂


Source: PartSelect.com

Espresso Machine History 101

Espresso is defined as “coffee brewed by forcing a small amount of nearly boiling water under pressure through finely ground coffee beans.” Sounds simple enough — and it is, when using the right equipment. Of course, using Café products (such as the BrewKups in Black Gold) provides an espresso-like coffee with even less steps.

Espresso today, of course, is the hero of the contemporary coffee scene — and the basis of many best-selling coffee drinks, such as the latte, cappuccino, mocha, macchiato and of course the traditional double espresso. For those coffee history buffs out there, today we’re going to take a trip down caffeine memory lane and look at how the modern espresso came to be:

The history of espresso can be traced back as far as 1884, when Angelo Moriondo lodged a patent for a “steam-driven instantaneous coffee beverage making device” in Turin, Italy. This patent is notable, and is considered by many to be a precursor of the espresso coffee machine.

Then, 17 years later in 1901, Milanese manufacturer Luigi Bezzera came up with some improvements to the espresso machine. He patented a number of these, the first of which was applied for on the 19th of December 1901. It was titled “Innovations in the machinery to prepare and immediately serve coffee beverage,” and the patent was granted in June, 1902.

Bezzera’s machine was a gigantic, steam-driven contraption with two groupheads called the Tipo Gigante. It is said that Bezzera, the owner of a manufacturing company, devised the machine in order to reduce the amount of time his employees spent on their coffee breaks. His invention yielded a coffee maker that used a combination of water and steam – forced under high pressure through the coffee grounds – to rapidly brew the coffee. Hence the name, “espresso machine.”

The downside to Bezzera’s machine was apparently that the device’s combination of hot water, steam and intense pressure produced a fast but bitter brew. In came Desiderio Pavoni, who purchased Bezzera’s patent in 1905. He became the first person to realize that the bitterness was the result of the steam and the very high temperatures it imposed on the coffee grounds. So, Pavoni began experimenting with various temperatures and pressures, and eventually discovered that brewing at 195 degrees with an 8 to 9 BAR of pressure produced the best results. This is the basis for espresso machines as we know them today.

The modern day espresso machine dates back to 1947, when Gaggia introduced the revolutionary piston lever Gaggia Crema Caffe machine. This was the first machine that was capable of consistently introducing pressurized water (8 BAR or higher) into coffee in a manner that was easy and inexpensive enough for everyday commercial use. Before that, almost every commercial and consumer espresso machine was steam driven and therefore, more akin to the modern day Moka brewer.

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The Two C’s of New World History

On March 15, 1493, Christopher Columbus returned to Spain after his first voyage to the New World. The 2 C’s could be considered to be Christopher Columbus, the explorer renowned for “discovering” North America and many other places in the New World. But, according to many, there are two other significant C’s in America — Coffee and Chocolate!

And the two are linked by more than just alliteration. When Christopher Columbus first sailed that ocean blue (as the rhyme goes) in 1492, he traveled to the so-called New World at the behest of the Queen of Spain. And two of the precious items he brought back to Europe? You guessed it: coffee and cacao beans.

Here’s a lowdown on some of the history that links Christopher Columbus with two of the Americas’ favorite treats — coffee and chocolate:

  • The introduction of coffee beans to the Americas is often attributed to Columbus, as it is thought that he carried coffee beans on one of his voyages to the New World.
  • Columbus is also often credited with bringing chocolate, by way of cacao beans, back to Europe and then on to the rest of the world.
  • Columbus is believed to have “discovered” cocoa beans in around 1502, when he and his crew appropriated the cargo of a native Mayan trading ship, near what is now known as Honduras.
  • Apparently Columbus assumed that the beans were some kind of almond. But, sensing the value placed upon these mysterious legumes, he took them.

So, what lesson can we take from this? Well, one thing’s for sure. We’d like to thank Columbus for that initial transportation of the magical beans behind coffee and chocolate. We guess we have him to thank, in a round-about way, for one of our favorite products — the Cafe Mocha. And we can bet he would have been a big fan of one of the best — the BrewKup™  in Chocolate Almond.  

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My Black Coffee Confessions

Today, let’s devote this article to one of the simplest pleasures in the world — a cup of strong black coffee. With Rae’s Café and Organo Gold, there’s more than one option for lovers of strong black coffee — a flavor that true coffee-lovers appreciate.

Gourmet Black Coffee

Fans of this great product can experience the aroma of freshly brewed coffee as soon as they tear open their sachet of OG Gourmet Black Coffee. Then comes the flavor, which is robust and smooth, for black coffee perfection.

Premium Gourmet King of Coffee 

Connoisseurs adore the aroma and flavor of this luxurious product. Organo Gold select only the finest organic beans to produce this bold, flavorful coffee. We like to think of it as a “necessary daily luxury” we can enjoy any time.

Premium Gourmet Royal Brewed

This delectable coffee comes straight from the famed blue mountains of Jamaica — a region renowned for its premium coffee. In Jamaica, the beans are hand-sorted to ensure only the finest coffee makes it into this fresh, fruity, flavorful blend, for a rich flavor that is second to none. This is a brew-it-yourself blend truly fit for royalty.

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